Widefield coach Fred Marjerrison returns to track after officiating NCAA wrestling finals

0
Photo - Widefield coach Fred Margerrison poses for a picture at the 2017 Terror Track and Field Invite on March 25, 2017 at Garry Berry Stadium. Photo by Isaiah J. Downing
Widefield coach Fred Margerrison poses for a picture at the 2017 Terror Track and Field Invite on March 25, 2017 at Garry Berry Stadium. Photo by Isaiah J. Downing

Fred Marjerrison wears many hats at Widefield High School.

For the past 19 years, the 1994 Widefield graduate has served many capacities at his alma mater, most notably as physical education teacher and longtime track and field coach. He also coached the football team from 2010-12.

But it's another profession, one as a college wrestling official, that kept Marjerrison away from his squad's first two track and field meets of the season. Last weekend, he was on the mat raising arms in victory at the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships in St. Louis, one of only 20 selected to the prestigious event.

"As my wrestling officiating career progressed, I was at the right place at the right time, and I got opportunities," Marjerrison said Saturday at the Terror Invitational at Garry Berry Stadium. "I've been blessed to do it, but I try to keep it low key. It's really a hobby, but a passion of mine. Everything that I do, I try to do the best I can. I'm just fortunate enough to be asked to do it."

Marjerrison, who has worked three NCAA Division I championships and 10 more at the Division II level, got to coach his teams firsthand Saturday. He saw the girls' team finish fourth, thanks to first-place efforts in the 400-meter relay, along with Brooke Moore's win in the 200. The boys' team placed seventh, helped by wins in the discus by Nathaniel Miller and in the 400 relay.

And his athletes were glad he was back.

"When he's gone, it can be a lot different," Moore said. "People can act differently, and it's kind of stressful. You start missing him. When he's here, things are where they're supposed to be."

While Marjerrison relishes the opportunity, he knows his place but has no regrets.

"I have a commitment to these young men and women here (at Widefield) and a commitment to my family and to my work," Marjerrison said. "Sometimes, there are little things in life you have a passion for. Fortunately, I have a passion for a lot of things, and I've been blessed with abilities to do things and share with other people."